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Klassy Pups Home of AKC Champions

Direct Import German Shepherds

King Charles Cavalier Spaniels, Havanese & Poodles( Toy , Mini & Standard)

Home of the Children and  Grandchildren of: Cooper( Duck Dynasty Triple Champion Titled Poodle) And Maibee The Prime Suspect
( Famous Champion Cavalier) Ch.  Babblers Rainbow End ,Ch.  Tommy at Jemini , Ch. Castlemar`s Ragin Bull Ch. Sheeba Super Trooper, Ch.Castlemar`s Birthday Boy Cavaliers, GCH Ch. Unique Anticipation, Ch. Peckerwoods Undenably, Ch. Unique Nora of Peckerwood Standard Poodles and so many more!!!

Cuka Winning the Sieger Championship

Videos of cuka working
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND3aZ3B7czE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GprOuOTE3Hg


Welcome to KLASSY PUPS where our focus is on providing high-quality service and customer satisfaction - we will do everything we can to meet your expectations.

With our Champion breeds and high standards, we're sure you'll be happy working with us. Look around our website and if you have any comments or questions, please feel free to contact us anytime at 678-332-1551 or by email at 
[email protected]

Max Barabak DOB: February 8, 2010
Tattoo: 07095
X-rays: HD, ED 0/0(excellent) officially stamped
Max is a direct Czech import. He is a proven stud of gorgeous pups
Ball drive, Obedience: http://youtu.be/FYElQvxW8Js
Max working
https://youtu.be/CCAUj2iwY84
Dam: SG Unny Leopard Rex Sire:
WUSV 2007 Nº 2 CACT Ergo Hartis Bohemia
Cuka is V1 rated, KKL1 rated, BH, AD & SchH1 titled. She has A1 Stamped hips and normal elbows and is DM clear. She is an import from Portugal and just turned 6 years old in September.  She is extremely sweet and VERY playful with a great amount of working drive. She can be VERY protective of her owners when around strangers. She produces beautiful pups with great personalities. born September 2009


German Champion Babblers Rainbow End Father of  Nissa Now Showing in the USA

NISSA


Champion Cooper Father of Princess Khalessi & Lady Sansa

Penny n Change Mother of Lord Tyrion

 

Champion Tommy at Jemini Pictured left Father to Lord Tyrion

I am a  Licensed and Inspected  Breeder!!!!!

The German Shepherd Dog

Also known as:

Alsatian,  Deutscher Schaferhund & GSD  


I am Proud to offer some of the Top lines of German Shepherds in the World!!


SIMPLY THE BEST OF THE BEST!!!!! 
Our goal is to produce clear-headed, social dogs that are not only good looking, but healthy from head to Tail!
Our dogs are bred with the personality that will suit most family house
holds. They can go on to be many things within your family or even go on to work or be a breeding dog; search and rescue,
agility, obedience, retrievers, schutzhund, police/ Patrol, tracking, dogs and the best part
is they will be very loyal to you and your family,
snuggle with you, and bark to alert you and your family when things
are not right. If a situation presents itself your Tropisch German Shepherd will do what it takes to keep you and your family
safe. The shear presence of a German Shepherd in a home is a
natural deterrent for most potential criminals.
We strive to work with very beautiful, sound minded & healthy German Shepherds so that you can enjoy great companions as well as amazing working dogs!
Our pups are raised in our home and socialized with us from day one!!
DRIVE, DESIRE, 
DETERMINATION
&
COMPANIONSHIP

BREEDING FOR THE LOVE OF THE GSD! THAT'S OUR PROMISE!
I am very proud of all my dogs and my breeding program and of my hard work!! It has paid off and I have been asked to be put on a Veterinarians list of people to contact when they are approached by some one looking for a excellent quality GSD. They were all just so impressed with the health testing I require prior to breeding, how well socialized my puppies are already at 8 weeks and how good they look!! Quality and passion will rise above the rest in the long run  The German Shepherd Dog~
           "If any breed of dog is most deserving of the title Noble with Natural Beauty then that dog is the German Shepherd.   They are a dog with elegant yet flowing lines, glamorous to behold, with a shining coat, erect ears, and an intelligent expression that will command attention wherever they are seen. Their eyes indicate the love and affection they have for those who care for them and their sweeping tail will show their mood whether it be happy or sad.   By nature a German Shepherd is wary of strangers, though once one is accepted by them they are a friend for life. They are efficient obedience worker, quick to learn and what is learned will never be forgotten. It is an active breed and thrives on work—little is beyond its capabilities. Fleet of foot, powerful yet graceful and nimble, they are the epitome of those qualities considered to be ideal within a dog.   They love human companionship and will respond to his owner’s mood whether this be lying quietly by his side or romping across the fields; indeed, at all times, their one desire is to be with you and to please you.
         They have a keen sense of humor and enjoys playful games yet, in defense of those he/she loves, can become a frightening adversary that one would be well advised to keep clear of. They can fit into a flat or a mansion as the need may be, for they are happy wherever you are happy.   In bringing a German Shepherd into your home, you are making an addition to your family and they will quickly feel a part of it. Your house, your garden, your possessions and in fact all that you own will from then on be in their special care. They need your love, but he/she needs also correct attention to their grooming, exercise, food, and general welfare. Given these, your German Shepherd will devote their very life to you and you will be the richer for this and for the companionship and love you both will share."

The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) has been the most popular breed of dog in the world for about 100 years. The ideal well-bred GSD is healthy (quite often living 12-15 years), mentally and physically suited to work in an amazing variety of jobs and climates, very attuned to its humans’ emotions, confident, intelligent, and adaptable. As a typical herding breed, it is one of the most pack-loyal breeds, which makes it ideal for families. They naturally are, or can be trained to be, guardians of their “pack”, whether sheep, children, or property. When their confidence is developed by training and encouragement, they can meet any challenge, intruder, or threat; their intelligence and instinct will allow them to assess any situation and act accordingly. This makes the GSD ideal as companion and protector.

The ideal GSD should appear alert, powerful, and poised, whether on guard or working in a variety of functions. Even in play, many give the impression of nobility, purpose, and strength. Much of that comes from the erect ear carriage and the shape of the head, but some comes from its size, body proportions, and agility. The appearance should make it easy for people to imagine it doing the jobs it has become famous for: herding, protecting livestock and other property, children’s companion, police and military utility, narcotics and bomb detection, search-and-rescue, crowd control, crime deterrence, and more. When you think of the GSD, one of the first words that come to mind is versatility.






Description

The German Shepherd Dog is well proportioned and very strong. The GSD has a sturdy, muscular, slightly elongated body with a light, solid bone structure. The head should be in proportion to its body, and the forehead a little rounded. The nose is most often black, however, blue or liver still do sometimes occur, but are considered a fault and cannot be shown. The teeth meet in a strong scissors bite. The dark eyes are almond-shaped, and never protruding. The ears are wide at the base, pointed, upright and turned forward. The ears of puppies under six months may droop slightly. The bushy tail reaches below the hocks and hangs down when the dog is at rest. The front legs and shoulders are muscular and the thighs are thick and sturdy. The round feet have very hard soles. There are three varieties of the German Shepherd: double coat, plush coat and longhaired coat. The coat most often comes in black with tan, sable or all black, but also can come in white, blue and liver, but those colors are considered a fault according to most standards. The white GSD dogs are recognized as a separate breed by some clubs and are being called the American White Shepherd. A piebald color has also occurred in a single GSD bloodline that is now being called a Panda Shepherd. A Panda is 35% white the remainder of color is black and tan, and has no white German Shepherds in its ancestry.

Temperament

Often used as working dogs, German Shepherds are courageous, keen, alert and fearless. Cheerful, obedient and eager to learn. Tranquil, confident, serious and clever. GSDs are extremely faithful, and brave. They will not think twice about giving their lives for their human pack. They have a high learning ability. German Shepherds love to be close to their families, but can be wary of strangers. This breed needs his people and should not be left isolated for long periods of time. They only bark when they feel it is necessary. Often used as police dogs, the German Shepherd has a very strong protective instinct, and is extremely loyal to its handler. Socialize this breed well starting at puppyhood. Aggression and attacks on people are due to poor handling and training. Problems arise when an owner allows the dog to believe he ispack leader over humans and/or does not give the dog the mental and physical daily exercise it needs to be stable. This breed needs owners who are naturally authoritative over the dog in a calm, but firm, confident and consistent way. A stable, well-adjusted, and trained dog is for the most part generally good with other pets and excellent with children in the family. They must be firmly trained in obedience from an early age. German Shepherds with passive owners and/or whose instincts are not being met can become timid, skittish and may be prone to fear biting and develop a guarding issue. They should be trained and socialized from an early age. German Shepherds will not listen if they sense that they are stronger minded than their owner, however they will also not respond well to harsh discipline. Owners need to have an air of natural authority to their demeanor. Do not treat this dog as if he were human. Learn canine instincts and treat the dog accordingly. German Shepherds are one of the smartest and most trainable breeds. With this highly skilled working dog comes a drive to have a job and a task in life and a consistent pack leader to show them guidance. They need somewhere to channel their mental and physical energy. This is not a breed that will be happy simply lying around your living room or locked out in the backyard. The breed is so intelligent and learns so readily that it has been used as a sheepdog, guard dog, in police work, as a guide for the blind, in search and rescue service, and in the military. The German Shepherd also excels in many other dog activities including Schutzhund, tracking, obedience, agility, flyball and ring sport. His fine nose can sniff out drugs and intruders, and can alert handlers to the presence of underground mines in time to avoid detonation, or gas leaks in a pipe buried 15 feet underground. The German Shepherd is also a popular show and family companion.

Height, Weight

Height: Males 24 - 26 inches (60 - 65 cm) Females 22 - 24 inches (55 - 60 cm)
Weight: 77 - 85 pounds (35 - 40 kg)

Living Conditions

The German Shepherd will do okay in an apartment if sufficiently exercised. They are relatively inactive indoors and do best with at least a large yard.

Exercise

German Shepherd Dogs love strenuous activity, preferably combined with training of some kind, for these dogs are very intelligent and crave a good challenge. They need to be taken on a daily, brisk, long walk, jog or run alongside you when you bicycle. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog's mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human. Most shepherds love to play ball or Frisbee. Ten to fifteen minutes of fetching along with daily pack walks will tire your dog out quite nicely as well as give him a sense of purpose. Whether it is ball chasing, Frisbee catching, obedience training, participation in a canine playgroup or just taking long walks/jogs, you must be willing to provide some form of daily, constructive exercise. The daily exercise must always include daily walks/jogs to satisfy the dog’s migration instinct. If under-exercised and/or mentally challenged, this breed can become restless and destructive. Does best with a job to do.

Life Expectancy

Around 13 years.

Grooming

This breed sheds bits of hair constantly and is a seasonally heavy shedder. They should be brushed daily or you will have hair all over your home. Bathe only when necessary; over bathing can cause skin irritation from oil depletion. Check ears and trim claws regularly.

Origin

In Karlsruhe, Germany, Captian Max von Stephanitz and other dedicated breeders produced a responsive, obedient and handsome German Shepherd using longhaired, shorthaired and wire-haired local herding and farm dogs from Wurtemberg, Thurginia and Bavaria. The dogs were presented at Hanover in 1882, and the shorthaired variety was first presented in Berlin in 1889. In April 1899, von Stephanitz registered a dog named Horan as the first Deutsche Schäferhunde, which means “German Shepherd Dog” in English. Until 1915, both longhaired and wire-haired varieties were shown. Today, in most countries, only the short coat is recognized for show purposes. The first GSD was shown in America in 1907 and the breed was recognized by the AKC in 1908. The German Shepherd Dogs used in movies Rin-Tin-Tin and Strongheart brought a lot of attention to the breed, making it very popular.

Group

Herding, AKC Herding

Recognition

ACA = American Canine Association Inc.

ACR = American Canine Registry

AKC = American Kennel Club

ANKC = Australian National Kennel Club

APRI = American Pet Registry, Inc.

CKC = Canadian Kennel Club

CKC = Continental Kennel Club

DRA = Dog Registry of America, Inc.

FCI = Fédération Cynologique Internationale

GSDCA = German Shepherd Dog Club of America

KCGB = Kennel Club of Great Britain

NAPR = North American Purebred Registry, Inc.

NKC = National Kennel Club

NZKC = New Zealand Kennel Club

UKC = United Kennel Club





The Different Bloodlines of the German Shepherd


The German Shepherd is hands down one of the most versatile dog breeds around. This is an intelligent breed capable of doing a wide variety of jobs. The original job of the dog was as a multi-purpose herder that could protect the flock, home and family, and be a companion pet at the end of the day. However, a split occurred that took the breed in two very different directions and created an American bloodline and a German bloodline.

Captain Max von Stephanitz is the German breeder who developed the German Shepherd dog. He wanted to create a smart, strong, courageous, protective and adaptable herding dog capable of doing his job and then returning home to his family to play with the children. Von Stephanitz was interested in the working ability of the breed, and everything he did was to preserve the characteristics and traits of the dog he developed.

In 1899, he mixed early versions of shepherd dogs to come up with the Deutsche Schäferhunde, the German Shepherd dog, and wrote the standard for the breed in 1901. Soon after, von Stephanitz created a test to evaluate each dog’s herding ability, and Schutzhund to measure their mental stability, protection ability, courage, willingness to work and obedience. Both tests determine if a dog is a good candidate to use in a breeding program. Any German Shepherd bred in Germany and Europe to this day must earn a Schutzhund I title or a certificate in herding in order to be used in breeding.

During and after WW II, many dog breeds were on the brink of extinction, including the German Shepherd. A lack of food and a distemper outbreak took a toll on the number of dogs throughout Europe. It was after the war when the American line and German line went in different directions, with American breeders more interested in breeding for show quality and the German breeders wanting to preserve the working traits of the breed.

The American Bloodline

The most pronounced difference between the American line and German line is the extreme angulation of the hindquarters, and the body has more of an angle from the front to the back. Both bloodlines adhere to the same standard, but the difference between American and German lines lies in the interpretation of the breed standard. American German Shepherds are slightly taller and longer then their German counterparts. The head is more refined, their body is a bit longer and angled, and they are generally heavier and lighter boned.

These dogs are bred for the show ring, and appearance and movement is the main focus of breeders. The sloped back gives the dog a “flying trot” which is the desired movement in the show ring. Compared to the German and European line, the American bloodline is considered by some to be a separate breed. They aren’t a working dog, although some American bred GSDs have been successful as a herder. However, they aren’t suited for police or military work, search and rescue or Schutzhund. Their coat color can be the traditional black and tan saddle pattern, solid black or white, bi-colors or sable. The breed standard for the American line is regulated by the American Kennel Club.

The German Bloodline

The one and only goal of German breeders is to maintain the working ability and temperament of the German Shepherd. Rin Tin Tin is from the German bloodline of the breed. These dogs are usually darker in color than the American bred dogs, with the traditional black and tan saddle pattern. The back doesn’t have the severe slope, nor does the dog have the “flying trot.” Canines from the German line are used in military and police work, search and rescue, Schutzhund, herding, protection and a variety of other jobs.

The German bloodline takes a very different interpretation of the breed standard which is regulated by the German Shepherd Club of Germany (SV) and strives to continue breeding the German Shepherd Dog for the characteristics and traits that were developed by von Stephanitz.

It’s important to understand the differences between the two bloodlines because it will matter which one you decide to get. Most German Shepherds from the American line will be impressive in the show ring because that’s the job they are bred to do. Some may do well in herding trials, agility, obedience or other dog sports, but they don’t have the temperament for Schutzhund or any other protection type of work. German Shepherds from the German bloodline excel at a variety of jobs, but they will not catch the eye of a judge in an American show ring.

Both bloodlines are bred to do a job, and if you are looking to add a German Shepherd to your family, knowing the difference between the two lines helps you decide which one is right for you. Have some knowledge about the breed before you buy, and make sure you’re dealing with a reputable breeder.


Please note some photos are representations of the breed and not Dogs owned by KLASSY

This is The Beautiful Renee Mother Of Nissa

Chantilly Lace Mother of Princess Khalessi & Lady Sansa

Pet Adoption

My dog and his love


He's with me 24 hours a day. Never a word is he able to say. But he can say more with a look or two,such as I Love You, My Whole World Is You! As I do my chores throughout the day, He's by my side, every step of the way. When I stop to eat, you can bet he's there,sitting of course, in his favorite chair. And if some night I decide to go out. He'll hang his head, and kinda pout. He sits by the window, until I come home. Sitting and waiting so patiently. Hoping to catch a glimpse of me, he can't wait till I put the key in the door.He's barking and jumping, and barking some more.Then as I lay me down to sleep.He's there by my side, his vigil to keep.And I thank the Lord, in the heaven above. For My Best Friend, my dog, and his love!

 

Author Unknown

ABOUT CAVALIERS:

 

 


The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is a small spaniel classed as a toy dog by The Kennel Club. It is one of the most popular breeds in the United Kingdom. Since 2000, it has grown in popularity in the United States. It is a smaller breed of spaniel, and Cavalier adults are often the same size as adolescent dogs of other spaniel breeds. It has a silky, smooth coat and commonly a smooth undockedtail. The breed standard recognizes four colours: Blenheim, Tricolour (black/white/tan), Black and Tan, and Ruby. The breed is generally friendly, affectionate and good with both children and other animals; however, they require a lot of human interaction.

The King Charles changed drastically in the late 17th century, when it was interbred with flat-nosed breeds. Until the 1920s, the Cavalier shared the same history as the smaller King Charles Spaniel. Breeders attempted to recreate what they considered to be the original configuration of the breed, a dog resembling Charles II's King Charles Spaniel of the Restoration.

 

Five children of King Charles I of England (1637) by Anthony van Dyck, featuring a spaniel of the era at the bottom right.

During the 16th century, a small type of spaniel was popular among the nobility in England. The people of the time believed that these dogs could keep fleas away, and some even believed that they could prevent forms of stomach illnesses.[2] These dogs were sometimes called the "Spaniel Gentle" or "Comforter", as ladies taking a carriage ride would take a spaniel on their laps to keep them warm during the winter.[3] Charles I kept a spaniel named Rogue while residing at Carisbrooke Castle; however, it is with Charles II that this breed is closely associated and it was said of him that "His Majesty was seldom seen without his little dogs".[2] There is a myth that he even issued an edict that no spaniels of this type could be denied entry to any public place.[2]

During the reign of King William III and Queen Mary II, the long nosed style of spaniel went out of fashion. The Pug was the favoured dog at the time in the Netherlands, and with William's Dutch origin, they became popular in England too. At this time interbreeding may have occurred with the Pug, or other flat nosed breeds, as the King Charles took on some Pug-like characteristics, but in any event the modern King Charles Spaniel emerged.[4] In The Dog in 1852, William Youatt was critical of the change in the breed:

The King Charles's breed of the present day is materially altered for the worse. The muzzle is almost as short, and the forehead as ugly and prominent, as the veriest bull-dog. The eye is increased to double its former size, and has an expression of stupidity with which the character of the dog too accurately corresponds. Still there is the long ear, and the silky coat, and the beautiful colour of the hair, and for these the dealers do not scruple to ask twenty, thirty, and even fifty guineas.[5]

During the early part of the 18th century, John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, kept red and white King Charles type spaniels for hunting. The duke recorded that they were able to keep up with a trotting horse. His estate was named Blenheim in honour of his victory at the Battle of Blenheim. Because of this influence, the red and white variety of the King Charles Spaniel and thus the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel became known as the Blenheim.[4]

Attempts were made to recreate the original King Charles Spaniel as early as the turn of the 20th century, using the now extinct Toy Trawler Spaniels. These attempts were documented by Judith Blunt-Lytton, 16th Baroness Wentworth, in the book "Toy Dogs and Their Ancestors Including the History And Management of Toy Spaniels, Pekingese, Japanese and Pomeranians" published under the name of the "Hon. Mrs Neville Lytton" in 1911.[6]

[edit]Divergence from King Charles Spaniel

Two Cavalier King Charles Spaniels on Great South Bay, Long Island

In 1926, American Roswell Eldridge offered a dog show class prize of twenty-five pounds each as a prize for the best male and females of "Blenheim Spaniels of the old type, as shown in pictures of Charles II of England's time, long face, no stop, flat skull, not inclined to be domed, with spot in centre of skull."[7] The breeders of the era were appalled, although several entered what they considered to be sub-par King Charles Spaniels in the competition. Eldridge died before seeing his plan come to fruition, but several breeders believed in what he said and in 1928 the first Cavalier club was formed.[7] The first standard was created, based on a dog named "Ann's Son" owned by Mostyn Walker,[8] and The Kennel Club recognised the breed as "King Charles Spaniels, Cavalier type".[7]

World War II caused a drastic setback to the breed, with the vast majority of breeding stock destroyed because of the hardship. For instance, in the Ttiweh Cavalier Kennel, the population of sixty dropped to three during the 1940s.[9] Following the war, just six dogs would be the starting block from which all Cavaliers descend.[7] These dogs were Ann's Son, his litter brother Wizbang Timothy, Carlo of Ttiweh, Duce of Braemore, Kobba of Kuranda and Aristide of Ttiweh.[10] The numbers increased gradually, and in 1945 The Kennel Club first recognised the breed in its own right as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel.[7]

The history of the breed in America is relatively recent. The first recorded Cavalier living in the United States was brought from the United Kingdom in 1956 by W. Lyon Brown, together with Elizabeth Spalding and other enthusiasts, she founded the Cavalier King Charles Club USA which continues to the present day. In 1994, the American Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club was created by a group of breeders to apply for recognition by the American Kennel Club. The Cavalier would go on to be recognised in 1997, and the ACKCSC became the parent club for Cavaliers.[11]

[edit]Description

Cavalier King Charles Spaniels traditionally come in four colours. Blenheim,

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is one of the largest toy breeds. Historically it was a lap dog, and modern day adults can fill a lap easily. Nonetheless, it is small for a spaniel, with fully grown adults comparable in size to adolescents of other larger spaniel breeds. Breed standards state that height of a Cavalier should be between 12 to 13 inches (30 to 33 cm) with a proportionate weight between 10 to 18 pounds (4.5 to 8.2 kg). The tail is usually notdocked,[12] and the Cavalier should have a silky coat of moderate length. Standards state that it should be free from curl, although a slight wave is allowed. Feathering can grow on their ears, feet, legs and tail in adulthood. Standards require this be kept long, with the feathering on the feet a particularly important aspect of the breed's features.[12]

The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the English Toy Spaniel can be often confused with each other. In the United Kingdom, the English Toy Spaniel is called the King Charles Spanielwhile in the United States, one of the colours of the Toy Spaniel is known as King Charles. The two breeds share similar history and only diverged from each other about 100 years ago. There are several major differences between the two breeds, with the primary difference being the size. While the Cavalier weighs on average between 10 to 18 pounds (4.5 to 8.2 kg), the King Charles is smaller at 9 to 12 pounds (4.1 to 5.4 kg). In addition their facial features while similar, are different; the Cavalier's ears are set higher and its skull is flat while the King Charles's is domed. Finally the muzzle length of the Cavalier tends to be longer than that of its King Charles cousin

The breed has four recognized colours. Cavaliers which have rich chestnut markings on a pearly white background are known as Blenheim in honour of Blenheim Palace, where John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, raised the predecessors to the Cavalier breed in this particular colour. In some dogs there is a chestnut spot in the middle of the forehead: this is called the "blenheim" spot. Black and Tan are dogs with black bodies with tan highlights, particularly eyebrows, cheeks, legs and beneath the tail.[Black and Tan is referred to as "King Charles" in the King Charles Spaniel. Ruby Cavaliers should be entirely chestnut all over,[1] although some can have some white in their coats which is considered a fault under American Kennel Club conformation show rules. The fourth colour is known as Tricolour, which is black and white with tan markings on cheeks, inside ears, on eyebrows, inside legs, and on underside of tail.[This colour is referred to as "Prince Charles" in the King Charles Spaniel

PopularityAccording to statistics released by The Kennel Club, Cavaliers were the sixth most popular dog in the United Kingdom in 2007 with 11,422 registrations in a single year. Labrador Retrievers were the most popular with 45,079 registrations in that year.[16] Their popularity is on the rise in America; in 1998 they were the 56th most popular breed but in both 2007 and 2008 they were the 25th most popular.[17]They ranked higher in some individual US cities in the 2008 statistics, being eighth in both Nashville and Minneapolis-St.Paul,[18] seventh in Boston, Atlanta[19] and Washington D.C.,[20] and sixth in both New York City[18] and San Francisco.[20] In 2009, the Cavalier was the fourth most popular breed in Australia with 3,196 registrations behind onlyLabrador Retrievers, German Shepherd Dogs and Staffordshire Bull Terriers.[21] In addition, there are also national breed clubs in Belgium, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Spain and Sweden.[22][edit]Temperament

The breed is highly affectionate, playful, extremely patient and eager to please. As such, dogs of the breed are good with children and other dogs. Cavaliers are not shy about socialising with much larger dogs.[23] They will adapt quickly to almost any environment, family, and location. Their ability to bond with larger and smaller dogs makes them ideal in houses with more than one breed of dog as long as the other dog is trained. The breed is great[citation needed] with people of all ages, from children to seniors, making them a very versatile dog. Cavaliers rank 44th in Stanley Coren's The Intelligence of Dogs, being of average intelligence in working or obedience. Cavaliers are naturally curious and playful, but also enjoy simply cuddling up on a cushion or lap.[24]

Cavaliers are active and sporting. They have an instinct to chase most things that move including vehicles on busy streets, and so most Cavaliers will never become "street-wise".[25] As they tend to regard all strangers as friends, members of the breed will usually not make good guard dogs. Spaniels have a strong hunting instinct and may endanger birds and small animals. However, owners have reported that through training their Cavaliers live happily with a variety of small animals including hamsters and gerbils.

 

 

 

 

About Havanese

The Havanese, a breed of Bichon type, is the national dog of Cuba, developed from the now extinct Blanquito de la Habana ("little white dog of Havana"). The Blanquito descended from the also now extinct Bichon Tenerife. It is believed that the Blanquito was eventually cross-bred with other Bichon types, including the Poodle, to create what is now known as the Havanese. Sometimes referred to as "Havana Silk Dogs", this was originally another name for the Blanquito de la Habana.

The Havanese is small in size and sturdy in structure with a tail carried over its back and ears that drop and fold. The coat is abundant, long, and silky and comes in all colors. The Havanese has a spirited personality and a curious disposition, and is notable for its springy gait, a characteristic that distinguishes the breed from all others.[2] The Havanese is considered an ideal family pet and a true companion dog. They are highly adaptable to almost any environment, and their only desire is to be with their human companions. Because of their strong social needs, Havanese will not thrive in an environment where they are isolated for several hours each day

Appearance

While a toy dog, Havanese are sturdy and not overly delicate. Most are 10 to 16 pounds (4.5 to 7.3 kg) and 8.5 to 11.5 inches (21.6 to 29.2 cm), with the ideal being 9 to 10.5 inches (23 to 26.7 cm) at the withers. The body, measured from point of shoulder to point of buttocks, is slightly longer than the height at the withers, giving the dog the appearance of being slightly longer than tall. The length of the body results from the long ribcage, not the loins.

A unique aspect of the breed is the topline, which rises just slightly from withers to croup, creating a topline that is straight but not level. Renowned for their flashy, lively gait, when on the move, their strong rear drive and slightly shorter upper arm produce a springy motion rather than a far-reaching one. The angle of the topline does not change while moving at a natural gait.[2]

The muzzle is full and tapers slightly at the nose. It does not have the appearance of being short or snipy. Length of skull measured from stop to point of occiput is equal to the length of muzzle. The top of the skull is rather flat and the backskull is rounded.

The length from foot to elbow is equal to the length from elbow to withers. The forechest is pronounced. When in a standing position, the sternum lines up with the elbows, creating a deep chest. Ribs are well-sprung and the abdomen is moderately tucked up.[2]

The Havanese has dark brown eyes and almond-shaped lids surrounded by black pigment. The ears, when extended, reach half way to the nose. They arc slightly upward at the base and hang down on the sides of the head without touching the face. The tail is carried arched forward up over the back. While the tail's long plume of hair falls on the body, the tail itself never touches the back.

The breed standard notes that except for slight trimming around the feet to allow for a tidy foot, they are to be shown untrimmed; any further trimming, back-combing, or other fussing is against type and will not be allowed to the point of precluding placement in dog shows. The breed standard specifies that the tail may not be docked. The American Kennel Club Standard allows head furnishings above each eye to be held in two small braids secured with plain elastic bands. However, many owners prefer to clip their pet's hair short for easy upkeep.

Color & markings

Black and grey Havanese. Round eyes and brown-and-black nose are not ideal for the breed.

Although there are a few arguments on whether the original Havanese were all white or of different colors, modern Havanese are acceptable in all coat colors and patterns. All colored dogs should have a black nose and black pigment around the eyes, with the exception of chocolate (brown) dogs, which may have dark brown pigment on their nose instead. Examples of coat colors are white, cream, fawn, red, brown, beige, Orange, silver, blue, and black. The coat may be one solid color or have markings in one or more other colors. For example, sable, brindle, black & tan, Irish pied, parti colored, belton, or piebald, black and white, beige black, and white.

Coat[

The coat is long, soft, lightweight, and silky. The Havanese coat is slightly wavy, profuse, and undulating. Unlike other double-coated breeds, the Havanese outer coat is neither coarse nor overly dense, but rather soft and light. The undercoat is sometimes completely absent. The Havanese coat should be very soft, almost cool to the touch, like unrefined silk (compared to the Maltese coat, which feels like refined silk). However, in some dogs the coat can become too silky, looking oily. On the other end of the spectrum, Havanese coats can be too harsh or cottony, giving a frizzy appearance.

Because of the tropical nature of the Havanese, the fine and lightweight coat is designed to act as a sunshade and cooling agent on hot days. This means that, though the coat is abundant and may appear warm, the Havanese must be protected from the cold. These dogs become cold very easily so keeping their coat longer in winter time is essential, especially since these dogs originate from hot weather.

The coat can be shown naturally brushed out, or corded, a technique which turns the long coat into cords of hair, similar to dreadlocks in humans. This corded look may be difficult to achieve for the first timer, so it is always recommended that someone interested in cording their Havanese consults someone who has done it before. Brushing out their fur is essential. This breed's fur grows very fast and without brushing it, the fur can become tangled easily. Also, even though this breed is hypoallergenic, if you do not frequently brush their fur it can cause their fur to fall out (shed) often.

The Havanese is a toy dog [3] It is smart and can be easily trained. It is best to train this dog at a young age, because some habits will stick as they become older. However, training these dogs while they are older is still possible. Like many toy breeds, the Havanese can be difficult to housebreak. However, the Havanese can be trained to use a litter box, which can greatly reduce issues with housebreaking. This breed is very smart and can be house trained faster than most toy dogs. The Havanese get very attached and are very loyal to their owners. These dogs often choose one owner to attach to and follow often. As a result, the Havanese does not do well in a household where it will be left alone all day. Some sources claim the Havanese is low maintenance but this is not the case. Although the Havanese is an active and lively dog, they are small enough that many of their exercise needs can be met in a house or yard, and therefore they do not require as much vigorous exercise as other breeds may. However, exercise is still necessary for this breed to be happy and healthy. These dogs love to play and be outside. The Havanese is satisfied when their owner is satisfied. Havanese are not very vocal unless abusive body movements are shown. They are very friendly dogs, and do not typically bark at strangers, but some individuals are more shy than other individuals. This breed has a great personality and temperament. These dogs love to play and be around people. Some of these dogs become independent and like to be around people but not smothered with love. If a dog, of any breed, appears particularly shy, extra care should be taken to socialize them thoroughly at a young age. They are not a dog that can live exclusively outside and prefer being inside with their owner. They love to perform in front of others and have a great need for affection. This breed is not afraid to show affection and loves getting attention. This breed is great with people and alway enjoyable. This breed is great in any type of home (big or small), they have such happy personalities. This breed is great with all ages of people.

Health

The Havanese are generally healthy dogs.

Havanese are generally healthy and sturdy with relatively few serious health issues. They typically live 14 to 16 years. Havanese organizations, such as the Havanese Club of America, monitor genetic issues to prevent propagation within the breed.

Havanese suffer primarily from luxating patella, liver disease, heart disease, cataracts[4][4] and retinal dysplasia.[4] Havanese sometimes tear and may develop brown tear stains, especially noticeable on white or light coats.

The Havanese Club of America developed a system to encourage widespread participation of seven recommended tests for eye disease (CERF), congenital deafness (BAER), patella luxation, cardiac diseases, hip dysplasia, hip joint disorder (Legg-Calve-Perthes), and elbow dysplasia. The Canine Health Information Center (CHIC) program promotes testing and reporting of health test results for the Havanese breed. CHIC is a centralized canine health database jointly sponsored by the AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) and the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA). Testing required for a Havanese to receive a CHIC certificate includes OFA BAER, OFA Hips, OFA Patellas, and annual CERF exams. This provides an outstanding research tool for performing searches on individual dogs and also links health testing results of the dog's related pedigree information (parent, offspring, and sibling), when those related dogs have been health tested.

History

The Havanese is a member of the Bichon family of dogs. The progenitors of the breed are believed to have come from Tenerife. Ship manifests from Tenerife bound for Cuba list dogs as passengers brought aboard, and these dogs were most probably the dog of Tenerife. Some believe the entire Bichon family of dogs can be traced back to the Tenerife dog, while others theorize that the origins are in Malta, citing the writings of Aristotle, and other historical evidence of the early presence of such dogs in Malta. Whatever the actual origins of Bichon dogs, these little dogs soon became devoted companions to the Spanish colonists in Cuba and were highly admired by the nobility.[2]

As part of the Cuban Revolution, upper-class Cubans fled to the United States, but few were able to bring their dogs. When American breeders became interested in this rare and charming dog in the 1970s, the US gene pool was only 11 dogs.[5]

With dedicated breeding, and the acquisition of some new dogs internationally, the Havanese has made a huge comeback and is one of the fastest growing breeds of dogs in the American Kennel Club (AKC).

Havanese at work

Havanese has a cheerful nature

Because of the cheerful and readily trained nature, they are used for a variety of jobs involving the public, including:

Havanese also compete in a variety of dog sports, such as

Dog agilityFlyballMusical canine freestyleObedience training

Black & white Irish Pied Havanese puppy

The profuse coat needs to be thoroughly combed at least twice per week. A Havanese with a dense or curly coat will be more prone to tangling and matting, thus requiring more frequent combing, than one with a silky, slightly wavy coat. If not showing the dog, it can be trimmed shorter to require less brushing. Many pet owners clip their dogs into a 1–2 inch long "puppy cut" for ease of maintenance.

If they go out in the snow, ice clumps will stick between their paw pads; just rinse off in warm water or buy booties. When you give them a bath, make sure to dry them. Some in shorter clips can blot and air dry, but most will need to be blown dry. You should also comb their hair out after bathing so as not to dry in mats. Use high air but low heat to protect their sensitive skin. Hot air can damage the skin.

Hair that grows on the bottom of their feet between the paw-pads needs trimming to allow traction on smooth floors. Some develop tear staining. A veterinarian might suggest treating red yeast issues to help diminish or eliminate staining; sometimes diet allergens are to blame and switching to a food without common allergens can be helpful. Excess tearing is sometimes a result of hair getting into the eyes; it is recommended that hair below eyes be allowed to grow out instead of shaved out. Havanese can wear a topknot or small braids to keep the hair out of their eyes during everyday activities.

As with any dog with dropped ears, the ears must be kept clean to help prevent ear infections. A cottonball can be placed just inside each ear before bathing to prevent excess water from entering in. After bathing, since it may be moist, pluck a few hairs inside the dog's ears to let air circulate through, preventing fungus from building.

The Havanese is not a yappy dog, but will alert its owners to approaching people. Usually acknowledging that you have heard their alert is enough to make them cease. Some have strong attachment issues, known by their owners as "velcro dogs", following household members everywhere, even into the bathroom.



The Poodle

The poodle is a group of formal dog breeds, the Standard Poodle, Miniature Poodle and Toy Poodle (one registry organisation also recognizes a Medium Poodle variety, between Standard and Miniature), with many coat colors. Originally bred in Germany as a type of water dog, the breed was standardized in France. The poodle is skillful in many dog sports, including agility, obedience, tracking, and even herding. Poodles have taken top honors in many conformation shows, including "Best in Show" at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in 1991 and 2002, and at the World Dog Show in 2007 and 2010.

Toy Poodles won "Best in Show" at Crufts in 1966 and 1982. Standard Poodles achieved the award in 1955, 1985 and 2002. The 2002 winner came from Norway and was the first overseas exhibit to win the Crufts best in show award

History

A 17th-century engraving of a poodle

The poodle is believed to have originated in Germany,[1] where it was known as the Pudelhund. Pudel (cognate with the English word "puddle"), is derived from the Low German verb meaning "to splash about", and the word Hund in German means "dog" (cognate with "hound"). The breed was standardized in France, where it was commonly used as a water retriever.[5] Due to the breeds popularity in France, it became established as its national breed.[1]

The European mainland had known the poodle long before it was brought to England. Drawings by German artist Albrecht Dürer established the popular image of the breed in the 15th and 16th centuries. It was the principal pet dog of the late 18th century in Spain, as shown by the paintings of the Spanish artist Francisco Goya. France had toy poodles as pampered favorites during the reign of Louis XVI at about the same period.[6]

The poodle has been bred in at least three sizes, including Standard, Miniature, and Toy. According to the American Kennel Club, the Standard Poodle is the oldest of the three varieties,[7] and was later bred down to the miniature and toy sizes. Despite the Standard Poodle's claim to greater age than the other varieties, some evidence shows the smaller types developed only a short time after the breed assumed the general type by which it is recognized today. The smallest, or Toy variety, was developed in England in the 18th century.

The Poodle, 1600s painting of the traditional poodle

Poodles are retrievers or gun dogs, and are still used by hunters in that role.[8] Their coats are moisture-resistant, which helps their swimming. All of the poodle's ancestors were acknowledged to be good swimmers, although one member of the family, the truffle dog (which may have been of Toy or Miniature size), it is said, never went near the water. Truffle hunting was widely practiced in England, and later in Spain and Germany, where the edible fungus has always been considered a delicacy. For scenting and digging up the fungus, the smaller dogs were favoured, since they did less damage to the truffles with their feet than the larger kinds. So it is rumored[9] that a terrier was crossed with the poodle to produce the ideal truffle hunter.

World War II working dogs

Poodles have been used as working dogs in the military since at least the 17th century. During WWII, Roland Kilbon of the New York Sun, reported that other countries had used dogs in their armies for many years. In his column he quoted Mrs. Milton S. (Arlene) Erlanger, owner of Pillicoc Kennels, a premier breeder of Poodles "The dog must play a game in this thing." Eventually, "With the blessing of the American Kennel Club, the Professional Handlers Association, obedience training clubs across the country, and Seeing Eye, Inc., a nation-wide program known as Dogs for Defense, Inc. was initiated and became the official procurement agency for all war dogs used in the Army, Navy and Coast Guard."[10] Dogs for Defense procured the dogs who were then trained by the Army. In 1942, the Poodle was one of 32 breeds officially classified as war dogs by the Army.

Characteristics

Appearance

An example of a three year-old silver male Standard Poodle. His weight is 75 lb (34 kg) and he measures 27 in (69 cm) at the withers. Pet clip.

An example 11 month old white Standard Poodle. Modern Clip.

White Standard Poodle. Continental clip

The poodle is a very active, intelligent and elegant dog, squarely built, and well proportioned. To ensure the desirable squarely built appearance, the length of body measured from the breastbone to the point of the rump approximates the height from the highest point of the shoulders to the ground. The eyes should be very dark, oval in shape, and have an alert and intelligent expression. The ears should fold over close to the head, set at, or slightly below, eye level. The coat should be of naturally curly texture, dense throughout, although most AKC-registered show dogs have a lion-cut or other, similarly shaven look.

Colors

Poodles have either a solid-colored or parti-colored coat. The dogs have a wide variety of coloring, including white, black, brown, parti, silver, gray, silver beige, apricot, red, cream, sable, and patterns such as phantom and brindle.[11]

For solid-colored poodles, the coat is an even and solid color at the skin. In blues, grays, silvers, browns, cafe-au-laits, apricots and creams, the coat may show varying shades of the same color. This is frequently present in the somewhat darker feathering of the ears and in the tipping of the ruff. While clear colors are preferred by registries, such natural variation in the shading of the coat is not to be considered a fault. Brown and cafe-au-lait poodles have liver-colored noses, eye rims and lips, dark toenails and dark amber eyes. Black, blue, gray, silver, cream and white poodles have black noses, eye rims and lips, black or self-colored toenails and very dark eyes. In the apricots, while the foregoing coloring is preferred, liver-colored noses, eye rims and lips, and amber eyes are permitted, but are not desirable. Incomplete color of nose, lips and eye rims, or a "mismatched" color are considered faults by registries.

Parti-colored poodles are recognized in poodle history as the original coloring of the poodle.[12] A parti poodle has solid-colored patches over a white coat. The coat will usually be white and colored in equal amounts, though it can vary with a larger percent of white. Registries prefer that parti poodles have the same points as its correlating solid-colored descendants. Brown and white parti poodles have liver-colored noses, eye rims and lips, dark or self-colored toenails and amber eyes. This is also permitted, but not preferred, in apricot and white parti poodles. Black/white, Blue/white, and silver/white poodles have black noses, eye rims and lips, black or self-colored toenails and very dark eyes.

Phantom poodles have the coloring of a Doberman Pinscher, with a lighter color appearing on their "eyebrows", muzzle and throat, legs and feet and below their tail. Like Dobermans, phantom poodles have either a black or brown main coat with a tan (usually apricot or red) lighter colorings around the eyebrows, muzzle, throat, legs, feet, and below their tail.

When the dog has markings that resemble those of a tuxedo, it is called a "tuxedo" poodle. The upper coat is solid: head, back, tail; and the lower coat is white: neck, chest, abdomen, and legs, making up usually 40% or more of the coat.

Poodle sizes

Unlike most breeds, poodles can come in a variety of sizes, distinguished by adult shoulder (withers) height. The exact height cutoffs among the varieties vary slightly from country to country. The Fédération Cynologique Internationale (FCI) recognizes four sizes of one breed: standard, medium, miniature, and toy.[13] Non-FCI kennel clubs generally recognize three sizes, standard, miniature, and toy, sometimes as sizes of the same breed and sometimes as separate breeds. Only the FCI describes a maximum size for Standard Poodles. France is the country responsible for the breed in the FCI, and in this country, the puppies of all sizes are listed together.[14] The terms royal standard, teacup, and tiny teacup are marketing  terms and are not reconized. All the Fédération Cynologique Internationale Poodles are in Group 9 Companion and Toy, Section 2 Poodle. All the Kennel Club poodles are in the Utility Group. All three sizes of poodles for the Australian National Kennel Council and the New Zealand Kennel Club are in the Non-sporting Group. The Canadian Kennel Club and the American Kennel Club place standard and miniature sizes in the Non-sporting Group, and the toy size in the Toy Group. The United Kennel Club places the miniature and toy in the Companion Group and the standard poodle in the Gundog Group.

Coat

Poodles, in traditional parti coloring, in a Modern Clip

Unlike most dogs which have double coats, poodles have a single layer coat (no undercoat is present) composed of dense, curly fur[16] that sheds minimally.[17] They could be considered hypoallergenic (though not completely allergen free).[18][19] The poodle does shed, but instead of the fur coming off the dog, it becomes tangled in the surrounding hair. This can lead to matting without proper care. Texture ranges from coarse and woolly to soft and wavy. Poodle show clips require many hours of brushing and care per week, about 10 hours/week for a Standard Poodle. Poodles are usually clipped down into lower-maintenance cuts as soon as their show careers are over. Pet clips are much less elaborate than show and require much less maintenance. A pet owner can anticipate grooming a poodle every six to eight weeks. Although professional grooming is often costly, poodles are easy to groom at home with the proper equipment.[citation needed]

Corded coat

A corded Standard Poodle

In most cases, whether a poodle is in a pet or show clip, the hair is completely brushed out. Poodle hair can also be "corded" with rope-like mats similar to those of a Komondor or human dreadlocks. Though once as common as the curly poodle, corded poodles are now rare. Corded coats are difficult to keep clean and take a long time to dry after washing. Any poodle with a normal coat can be corded when its adult coat is in. Corded poodles may be shown in all major kennel club shows.[20][21][22]

Show clips

Many breed registries allow only certain clips for poodles shown in conformation. In American Kennel Club (AKC) shows, adults must be shown in the "Continental" or "English saddle" clips. Dogs under 12 months old may be shown with a "puppy clip". The AKC allows the "Sporting" clip in Stud Dog and Brood Bitch classes, as well.[citation needed]

Some sources believe the show clips evolved from working clips, which originally provided warmth to major joints when the dogs were immersed in cold water. The rest of the body is shaved for less drag in the water. Others express skepticism at this theory, instead citing the French circus as the origin of the entertaining and unique clips.[citation needed]

Second puppy

The second puppy clip is also called the Scandinavian clip or puppy clip. It was invented by Swedish and Norwegian show groomers in the 1970s. It is the most common one in all sizes for shows in Europe, and is allowed for adult poodles to be shown in the FCI countries. The face, throat, belly, feet and the base of the tail are shaved five to seven days before the show to get a nice, smooth appearance of the shaved areas. The hair on the head is left to form a "topknot", fixed in place using latex bands, because in most European countries, hair spray is banned. The rest of the dog is shaped with scissors. It makes the parts of the dog look fluffy.[citation needed]

Continental clip

In the continental clip, the face, throat, feet and part of the tail are shaved. The upper half of the front legs is shaved, leaving "fluffy pompons" around the ankles. The hindquarters are shaved except for pompons on the lower leg (from the hock to the base of the foot) and optional round areas (sometimes called "rosettes") over the hips. The continental clip is the most popular show clip today.[citation needed]

English saddle clip

The English saddle clip is similar to the continental, except for the hindquarters, which are not shaved except for a small, curved area on each flank (just behind the body), the feet, and bands just below the stifle (knee) and above the hock, leaving four (4) pompons. This clip is now rarely seen in standard poodles.[citation needed]

Pet clips

Pet clips can be as simple or as elaborate as owners wish. The hair under the tail should always be kept short to keep feces from matting in the dog's curls. Most owners also keep the feet and face clipped short to prevent dirt from matting between toes, tear stains on lighter-coated poodles and food from matting around the dog's muzzle. Beyond these sanitary requirements, desired clips depend on owners' preferences. Some owners maintain a longer clip in winter than summer, which they groom often with a wire slicker brush to remove tangles and prevent matting.[citation needed]

Different Poodle appearances

A Standard Poodle retrieving a gamebird

Red and apricot Poodles

A brown Standard Poodle at five weeks

Phantom Poodles

A medium-sized poodle in the Scandinavian clip

Standard poodle apricot

Temperament

A Standard Poodle catching a ball

Of note is this breed's keen sense for instinctive behavior. In particular, marking and hunting drives are more readily observable than in most other breeds. Classified as highly energetic, poodles can also get bored fairly easily, and have been known to get creative about finding mischief.[23]

Health

The most common serious health issues of Standard Poodles (listed in order of the number of reported cases in the Poodle Health Registry (as of August 20, 2007) are Addison's disease, gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV = bloat/torsion), thyroid issues (hyperthyroid and hypothyroid), tracheal collapse, epilepsy, sebaceous adenitis, juvenile renal disease, hip dysplasia, and cancer. Standard Poodles are also susceptible to some health issues usually too minor to report to the health registry. The most common of these minor issues is probably ear infection. Ear infections are a problem in all poodle varieties because their nonshedding coat grows into the ear canal, where it traps wax and dirt. Ear problems can be minimized by proper ear care, including regular cleaning and plucking of hair within the ear canal. A veterinarian should be consulted if the dog shows signs of an ear infection.

Addison's disease

Addison's disease is (as of August 20, 2007) the illness most commonly reported to the Poodle Health Registry. The number of reported cases is nearly twice as high as the next most common problem (GDV). Addison's disease is characterized by insufficient production of glucocorticoid and/or mineralocortoid in the adrenal cortex (near the kidneys). Addison's is often undiagnosed because early symptoms are vague and easily mistaken for other conditions. Standard Poodles with unexplained lethargy, frequent gastric disturbances, or an inability to tolerate stress should be tested for it. Addison's can cause fatal sodium/potassium imbalances, but if caught early and treated with lifelong medication, most dogs can live a relatively normal life.[citation needed]

Longevity

Standard Poodles in UK, Denmark and USA/Canada surveys had a median lifespan of 11.5 to 12 years.[25] In a UK survey, the most common causes of death were cancer (30%), old age (18%), GDV (6%), and cardiac disease (5%).[26]

Miniature and Toy Poodles in UK surveys had median lifespans of 14 to 14.5 years.[25] In Miniatures, the leading cause of death was old age (39%).[26] In Toys, the leading causes of death were old age (25%), and kidney failure (20%).[26]

Some Toy Poodles can live up to 20 years, if they have healthy lives and are not overweight. The oldest poodle that ever lived was Lady who lived to be 28 years and 218 days old. She was born in 1908 and died on August 6, 1937.

Poodle mixes

Main article: Poodle hybrid

Twelve-week-old Cockapoo puppy

Poodles are crossed with other breeds for various reasons, and the resulting puppies (called designer dogs) are described by whimsical portmanteau words, such as cockapoo or spoodle (Cocker Spaniel), maltipoo (Maltese), goldendoodle, labradoodle (Labrador), Schnoodle (Schnauzer), pekepoos (Pekingese), Cavapoo (Cavalier King Charles), Bernedoodle (Bernese Mountain Dog) and many others.

A cross between a shedding breed and a poodle (which does not shed much) does not reliably produce a nonshedding dog. Traits of puppies from crossbreedings are not as predictable as those from purebred poodle breedings, and the crosses may shed or have unexpected or undesirable qualities from the parent breeds.

Poodle crossbreds (also called hybrids) are not recognized by any major breed registry, as crossbreds are not one breed of dog, but two. If both parents are registered purebreds but of different breeds, it is still not possible to register a puppy as two different breeds. Some minor registries and Internet registry businesses will register dogs as any breed the owner chooses with minimal or no documentation; some even allow the breeder or owner to make up a new "breed name".

Hypoallergenic qualities

Miniature poodle

Poodles are often cited as a hypoallergenic dog breed. Their individual hair follicles have an active growth period that is longer than that of many other breeds of dogs; combined with the tightly curled coat, which slows the loss of dander and dead hair by trapping it in the curls, an individual poodle may release less dander and hair into the environment. In addition, most poodles are frequently brushed and bathed to keep them looking their best; this not only removes hair and dander, but also controls the other potent allergen, saliva.[33]

Although hair, dander, and saliva can be minimized, they are still present and can stick to "clothes and the carpets and furnishings in your home"; inhaling them, or being licked by the dog, can trigger a reaction in a sensitive person. An air cleaner, air duct outlet and vacuuming with a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter can help clear dander floating in the air.[34]

The word hypoallergenic, when referring to a dog, is also a misconception; all dogs shed. Poodles shed hair in minimal amounts, and also release dander, but are not as likely to trigger allergies as much as many other breeds.

 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT CAVANESE

 

 The Cavanese is a hybrid dog that is made up of a combination of two different purebreeds. It's a cross between the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and the Havanese

Cavanese have the sweetest little personalities we've ever seen. Calm and loving, they don't all look alike, but so far the dispositions have been consistent.

We love them and you might too. Puppies are priced by appearance only---all come from health-certified parents and all are health checked by our vet.

They have the typical standard wonderful, loving, mellow temperament of a cavalier.  The Cavanese are a very friendly and loving breed. It is considered to have one of the better personalities for small dog breeds. It is patient and suited for children. This is a companion breed and loves the company of others. It is not yippy and some may have a deep bark. The Cavanese is intelligent and easily trained.

 

 

 


 

A quick Thank you to Google for its reference and words on the breeds.